Go nuts to significantly lower risk of obesity and diabetes

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… and aid your weight management strategy

A surprising number of people avoid eating nuts as they retain the false stigma that the calories derived from a handful of nuts contribute to weight gain. Nuts also deliver a higher percentage of fat calories per ounce than many nutritionally deficient processed foods and are thus considered to be unhealthy. As the incidence of metabolic syndrome (six health metrics that increase risk of diabetes, heart disease and many other potentially fatal chronic conditions) continues to skyrocket in many unsuspecting individuals, a wealth of scientific evidence now shows that eating a variety of tree nuts is not only beneficial to our health, but also helps lower obesity prevalence in the adult population and aids weight management as part of a natural food diet.

A research team from Loma Linda University in California studied 803 Seventh-day Adventist adults to establish an association between tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), metabolic syndrome (MetS) and obesity in a population with a wide range of nut intake ranging from never to daily. Publishing the results of their work in the journal PLOS ONE, the scientists were able to determine that the amount of tree nuts consumed daily correlated directly to the prevalence of obesity in the adult participants.

Tree nuts improve metabolic profile to lower MetS abnormalities and improve weight loss efforts

The researchers used a validated food frequency questionnaire to determine the daily intake of tree nuts and peanuts, both together and separately. The participants were then rated as to high tree nut consumption, averaging 16 grams per day, to low consumption with an average intake of 5 grams per day. Lead study author, Dr. Karen Jaceldo-Siegl noted “Our results showed that one serving (28g or 1 ounce) of tree nuts per week was significantly associated with 7 percent less MetS… doubling this consumption could potentially reduce MetS risk by 14 percent.”

MetS (consisting of increased abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and hyperglycemia) signals metabolic deterioration as the body is forced to deal with a cascade of physical abnormalities that ultimately lead to cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia and drastically lowered quality of life.

Regular consumption of tree nuts can lower the risks associated with MetS as they help to balance oxidized cholesterol ratios and improve vascular function, largely due to the quality, monounsaturated fat content and wealth of minerals supplied in a handful of the small tasty gems.

Another benefit found by the researchers is lowered body weight. Although nuts are relatively high in calories, they squelch appetite by providing a solid source on non-animal protein and have little to no impact on blood glucose levels. Additionally, there is some evidence to suggest that the monounsaturated fats are conserved by the body for cellular metabolism and are not readily burned as a source of fuel by the body.

Dr. Jaceldo-Siegl concluded “We found that high tree nut consumers had significantly lower prevalence of obesity compared to the low tree nut consumers… and, high consumers of tree nuts had the lowest prevalence of obesity when compared to the low peanut/tree nut groups.” Nutrition experts recommend eating 1.5 ounces of tree nuts each day, the amount in a good size handful, to ward off chronic disease processes and help keep weight in check.

Dietary Supplement Users are More Likely to Receive Necessary Nutrients, Make Better Health Decisions

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Often enough, especially recently, Natural News has been fending off mainstream medical attacks on supplements. The mainstream media supports whatever biased and bogus reports mainstream researchers release, probably because a lot of advertising money comes from Big Pharma and the rest of the Medical Mafia.

And also because of what Mike Adams said in a December 17, 2013, Natural News article: “Mainstream media reporters are, by and large, outrageously ignorant about nutrition, isolated nutrients, whole foods, the games Big Pharma plays, the corruption of the science journals and so on.”

The most recent supplement and multivitamin attacks got a lot of favorable press. And they gave the ghoulish Dr. Paul Offit of “babies can tolerate 1,000 vaccinations at the same time” fame another platform for promoting his new book that rails against vitamin and mineral supplements, herbs and Linus Pauling.

Although not with same impact as the attacks on supplements that were featured in several major mainstream outlets, a counterattack has been launched and recently published as a study in the peer-reviewed Nutrition Journal.

Naturally, the lamestream media hasn’t run with the story and probably won’t even walk with it.

Here’s what the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) published

The study was titled “Health Habits and Other Characteristics of Supplement Users.”

CRN conducted a mega-study of 20 different peer-reviewed scientific journal articles and found that, “overall, the evidence suggests that users of dietary supplements are seeking wellness and are consciously adopting a variety of lifestyle habits that they consider to contribute to healthy living.”

CRN noted that over half of US supplement users were covered in the 20 studies they reviewed. Contrary to the notions spread by supplement naysayers, most of those surveyed used supplement-based strategies to bolster better food choices instead of using supplements to replace the nutritional void from poor food choices and sedentary lifestyles.

In other words, supplement users were not ignoring food for nutrition. The mega-study determined that those who took supplements also made better nutritional choices with foods than their non-supplement consumer counterparts, who usually made poorer food choices.

The study revealed that enriching or fortifying foods helped increase nutritional values, but combining supplements with whole foods had more impact toward increasing nutritional intake. There was no mention of organic food comparisons in the CRN press release.

But the study’s bottom line that supplement users were more concerned about taking responsibility for their health and were doing so successfully could be what the medical mafia doesn’t want others to know. Ya think?

The most ignored supplements are the most important – minerals

In 1936, journalist Rex Beach covered a maverick MD’s agricultural research in a lengthy article published in Cosmopolitan magazine. The MD, Dr. Charles Northen, had turned to soil science, because he realized that nutrition is the basis of health, and our crops, even in 1936, were lacking minerals due to poor top soil mineral balances.

He advocated doing what small organic farmers are discovering now, ways to balance the soil’s mineral composition so that synthetic fertilizers and pesticides wouldn’t be necessary, and the crop foods would be more nutritious.

“Bear in mind that minerals are vital to human metabolism and health [emphasis added] – and that no plant or animal can appropriate to itself any mineral which is not present in the soil upon which it feeds,” asserted Dr. Northen. “Lacking vitamins, the system can make some use of minerals, but lacking minerals, vitamins are useless.”

The article was entered into the U.S. Senate archives as Senate Document 264, 74th Congress, 1936. Of course, it went nowhere. Big Ag flourished with the “Green Revolution” in the mid-1940s, and things only got worse until the organic food movement accelerated after the 1960s.

Minerals are even more important than vitamins. For example, most Americans are magnesium deficient, yet magnesium is involved in over 300 cellular metabolic processes. And vitamins don’t perform as well without minerals.

There are macrominerals, measured in milligrams, and trace minerals, measured in micrograms. Both types are essential, because the body doesn’t manufacture them. They should be taken from food, but most food coming from depleted top soils are lacking. So mineral supplements are necessary.

Just what types of mineral supplements are most effective is covered very well by the iconoclastic chiropractor Dr. Tim Shea of the Doctor Within.

Spirulina – the Ultimate Ocean Protein

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Is spirulina the best protein on Earth? Honestly, if a health ‘expert’ tells you that one protein source is better for you than another – be careful. In reality, we all absorb nutrients in a variety of ways due to personal health history, age, food combining, heavy metal toxicity, genetics – the list goes on and on.

Are you protein deficient? On the next NaturalNews Talk Hour, Jonathan Landsman and Dr. Gerald Cyweski, a top expert on large-scale microalgae production talk about one of the most popular superfoods on the planet – spirulina. We’ll discuss the safety concerns surrounding spriulina – especially since the Fukushima nuclear accident; why all brands are not created equal plus much more.

Should everyone be consuming spirulina?

First of all, as a long-time vegetarian, I must admit it’s easy to become protein (or nutrient) deficient on any diet, including the widely-celebrated vegan way of life. Too many vegetarians opt for ‘fake meat’ products – loaded with genetically engineered or heavily processed soy ingredients. These synthetic proteins create hormonal imbalances, thyroid disorders plus a host of immune system problems.

Generally speaking, chronic fatigue, emotional stress or any other chronic health condition can be linked to a poor diet. When considering which protein is best for you – always consider the quality first. If you prefer an animal-based protein diet – be sure to eat 100% grass-fed beef or raw (grass-fed) dairy products to avoid the genetically engineered toxins fed to conventionally-raised animals.

Keep in mind, conventionally-raised animal food producers don’t want you to know how their animals are fed. In truth, most of these animals are eating GMOs, getting pumped with antibiotics and fed the lowest-cost (unnatural) animal feed.

Conversely, many vegetarians eat too many processed carbohydrates, synthetic vitamins and minerals and foreign proteins – which leave the body nutrient deprived. Low-quality protein intake can lead to cellular stress; low sex drive; poor brain function, eye health and cardiovascular disease.

If you’re looking for a good source of protein – just 3 grams of high-quality spirulina provides 60% protein, lots of vitamins and minerals plus many phytonutrients for optimal health.

How does spirulina reverse disease conditions?

Spirulina, known as a cyanobacteria or blue-green algae, are found in pristine freshwater lakes, ponds, and rivers. This truly ‘super’ food offers health benefits to almost every organ and bodily function. If you’re looking for cellular regeneration, accelerated wound repair or faster healing time – spirulina can help. By enriching the immune system, you’re less likely to experience colds, flus or other infectious diseases.

In this computer age, many people are looking to improve their eye health. Rich in antioxidants, spirulina is 10 times richer than carrots (per gram) in vitamin A – especially good for nourishing the eyes. Today, we view inflammation as an underlying stress in every disease – spirulina happens to be one of the most potent anti-inflammatory agents found in nature. And, finally, a strong digestive system will help to detoxify the body. Find out how spirulina helps to heal leaky gut syndrome and autoimmune diseases.

This week’s guest: Dr. Gerald Cyweski, the world’s leading authority on microalgae production

Dr. Gerald Cysewski received his doctorate in Chemical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley. As co-founder of Nutrex-Hawaii, Dr. Cysewski has served as a director of the company since 1983 and, until 1996, also served as the Scientific Director. From early 1990 to May 2008, Dr. Cysewski served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company and – in October 1990 – was appointed to the position of Chairman of the Board.

In the early 1980s, Dr. Cysewski was a group leader of Microalgae Research and Development at Battelle Northwest, a major contract research and development firm and, before that, was an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara – where he received a two-year grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a culture system for blue-green algae.

Don’t waste your health on cheap protein. The established medical and media outlets want to brainwash people into believing that health insurance will prevent disease. In reality, high-quality (organic) food is the best way to prevent disease and protect the environment.

Prickly Pear: Discover the Healing Power of an Ancient Aztec Superfood

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If you live in Latin America, or a semi-arid region of the United States, a wild superfood may be ripe for the picking in your own backyard. Known as prickly pear cactus (Opuntia spp), the leaves and fruit of this desert plant can be harvested and consumed to treat a variety of conditions — including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and inflammation.

Native to the mountainous areas of Mexico, prickly pear cactus has been used since ancient times as a potent medicine, as well as a daily food source. Many of the nutritional advantages of the plant are attributed to its growing habitat – namely, volcanic soil and high altitude. The Aztecs so valued prickly pear that it was considered food fit for warriors and royalty. Jump to the present day and you’ll find health enthusiasts have also embraced the food for boosting stamina, improving health and slimming down.

Health perks

A common sight in Hispanic communities and Latin America, cactus as a food may seem exotic to those unfamiliar with its use. And yet, science is beginning to recognize prickly pear as a beneficial food and therapeutic medicinal for many of the health disorders plaguing us today. One of the more intriguing uses for the cactus paddle (known as nopales) is in the treatment of diabetes. As a low-glycemic, high-fiber food, nopales lowers blood sugar levels, helping to keep obesity and diabetes at bay. Moreover, research published in Chemistry Central Journal found that consuming either tortillas or bars made with nopales increased vitamin C plasma levels, and reduced both cholesterol as well as triglycerides – which is good news for those concerned about cardiovascular disease.

As an added benefit, the plant sterols found in prickly pear act as antioxidants in the system, reducing inflammation and deterring the formation of plaque on blood vessel walls. What’s more, the flavonoids present in the cactus minimize free radical load, which lessens the strain on the liver and boosts overall immunity. Since the fruit and leaves of the plant are loaded with non-carbohydrate polysaccharides in the form of pectin, hemicellulose and mucilage, prickly pear soothes and coats the digestive tract, relieving constipation as well as ulcers.

How to use

Fresh prickly pear nopales and fruit can often be found in your local supermarket – just be cautious about the source as some varieties from Mexico are contaminated with a potent neurotoxic pesticide. Tortillas and fruit bars made from prickly pear are also available. Additionally, organic nopales powder is an easy way to spruce-up your favorite smoothie. If you are lucky enough to have prickly pear cactus growing wild in your neighborhood, have a look at this informative tutorial on how to harvest and juice the fruit.

Free Healthy Recipes: Best Tomato Soup…Gourmet Vegetarian Cuisine

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Pleasure the palate, nourish the body…

Soup’s On … Wow ‘em at the dining table with iLoveToLiveWell’s Bistro-Style, Tomato Bisque.

The eyes behold a rich fusion bursting with gloriously vivid, electric vermilion gorgeousness. Wafts of the irresistible, enchanting aroma tantalize the nasal. With each comforting, warming and cozy slurp…the lips lapse luxuriously into velvety delight. Then, the tongue swirls in a pool of sassy spiciness and seductive sweetness. The mind captivated in the romanticism of this cloud nine, cherishable dining interlude. All the while, the body flourishes with nourishment par excellence! Eat slowly to savor the ecstasy of these grand, gastronomic moments.
…the epitome of Recipes That WOW!

The Culinary Adventure
Let’s Get Homestyle Cooking

Yield is three quarts.
1} Put into a 5-quart pot:

In The Red
Tomatoes (red, low water content) = 48 ounces, leave skin and seeds intact
Weigh tomatoes…then core them.
Chop tomatoes into ½ inch by ½ inch pieces.
Sublime is the sapor of heirloom…unparalleled!

Pass The Thyme
Thyme (minced leaf), dried (thymus vulgaris) = 1 tablespoon
Measure minced, thyme leaf…then grind it to powder.

It’s About Thyme
A fresh perspective…

Splendid is 3 tablespoons of fresh thyme…instead of the 1 tablespoon, dried herb.

It’s Getting Hot In Here
Red chili pepper flakes = 1/8 teaspoon

Water, free of impurities = 4 cups

You say tomato… I say tomahto
Tomatoes, sun-dried = 3 ounces
If sun-dried tomatoes are without salt…accent this recipe with a little extra salt, up to ¼ teaspoon.

The sun-dried tomatoes will absolutely make or break this recipe. Be quite discriminating…sample a few varieties. Use sun-dried tomatoes of superior quality!

Which Direction To Go?

2} Lid pot…bring liquid to a rolling boil.
3} Simmer for 30 minutes…keep lid on pot for this entire time.

The Buzz
Run kitchen timer to count down the 30 minutes…all set, timing is everything!

Meanwhile…
4} Ready the following flavor enhancements…place them in a sauté pan:

Onion bulb, strip away its ends and peel it = 3 cups
Chop yellow onion into ¼ inch by ¼ inch pieces.

Bay leaf, dried = 1 leaf, in its whole form
A top-notch gourmet choice is…Turkish bay: laurus nobilis.
Feel free to choose 3 fresh bay leaves…in lieu of the dried leaf.

Salt, unrefined (fine grain) = ¼ teaspoon
Tingle the palate with one of this author’s most beloved salts…Andes Mountain Bolivian Rose Rock Salt!

Water, free of impurities = ½ cup, dry measure

What Happens Now?
5} Cook onion til it’s crisp-tender.

A culinary conundrum? What’s crisp-tender?
Cook til just tender…but still somewhat crunchy.

Not confident enough?
Put a fork in it!
Is there a bit of resistance when pressed into the onion? If yes… Then, we have success!
Moving on with savoir faire…

Once onion is crisp-tender…
6} Introduce garlic to the pan.

Garlic, mince it = 2 tablespoons
Click here … Get garlicky!

7} Sauté garlic for 2 or 3 minutes.
8} Fish out the bay leaf.
Everything’s panning out wonderfully well!

***Special Attention***
Only a high-speed, blender machine will pulverize the skin…and tiny seeds…of a tomato.

9} Place the salted, aromatic trio into a high-speed blender…along with:

Honey = 1 teaspoon
Select pure honey that hasn’t been processed…heated and/or filtered.

Salt, unrefined (fine grain) = ½ teaspoon

Peppercorns, black = scant, ½ teaspoon
Relish in the exquisite bouquet and zesty bite of pepper with these fine, gourmet picks of…Madagascar, Tellicherry, Malabar, Lampong or Sarawak. For its ultimate essence…always freshly grind peppercorns just before incorporating them into a meal.

A Slick Move
Olive oil = 2 tablespoons
Consider an unfiltered…extra-virgin…olive oil made from an ancient variety of olive…tree ripened…that’s been ice pressed or hasn’t been subjected to heat.

Butter, dairy = 2 tablespoons

Right On Course
Have handy a 3-quart pot.

10} Add…to the blender…a portion of what’s in the 5-quart pot.
11} And away we go… Have at it… A few zaps of the machine… Voila, smooth as silk.
Avoid spurting… Careful pureeing hot liquids. Start out on a low speed…gradually increase speed.
12} Transfer this beautiful, fragrant puree to a 3-quart pot.
13} Pour…into the blender…the remainder of what’s in the 5-quart pot.
14} Spin about the ingredients, and break into a chorus or two of… “Hey Good Lookin’! What Ya Got Cookin’?”
15} Join the luscious silk to the 3-quart pot…stir things up.
16} Lid pot to keep bisque warm.

If desired, garnish each bowlful with a complimentary dairy cheese…or perhaps a splash of heavy cream.

For both ultimate nutrition and flavor…consume foods that are heirloom, grown organically, sustainably or biodynamically.

Bon appetit!